PISM Report: Polish Experience in Reconciliation: A Model for Rapprochement in East Asia?
16 MAY 2014 Report
East Asia is a region where historical disputes and misunderstandings have not been successfully overcome yet. One of the serious problems is a general lack of trust between countries such as Japan and Korea or Japan and China, stemming from the difficult history of bilateral relations. Poland and other European countries experienced similar or even higher levels of distrust as a result of the atrocities of World War II, but the Europeans managed to launch dialogue and now Europe is perceived as a continent with a successful reconciliation legacy. The report was edited by Justyna Szczudlik-Tatar and Piotr Mejssner.
East Asia is a region where historical disputes and misunderstandings have not been successfully overcome yet. One of the serious problems is a general lack of trust between countries such as Japan and Korea or Japan and China, stemming from the difficult history of bilateral relations. Poland and other European countries experienced similar or even higher levels of distrust as a result of the atrocities of World War II, but the Europeans managed to launch dialogue and now Europe is perceived as a continent with a successful reconciliation legacy.

Europe is eager to share its experiences with Asia, and the Report presents the main ideas discussed by Polish, Korean and German scholars at the international seminar “Polish Experience in Reconciliation: A Model for Rapprochement in East Asia?” organized in March 2014 by PISM in cooperation with and financial support from the Korea Foundation. It describes the key problems in East Asia reconciliation, elaborates on the characteristic features and mechanisms of Polish and European rapprochement and proposes steps that might be undertaken by Korea and other states to launch a reconciliation process in East Asia. The Report also includes a keynote speech by prof. Adam Daniel Rotfeld: Poland–Germany–Russia: An Experience with the Reconciliation Process and Dialogue.

The report was edited by Justyna Szczudlik-Tatar and Piotr Mejssner.