PISM Report: Nuclear Energy in Poland
30 SEP 2014 Report
Discussions of the rationale for building a nuclear power plant in Poland have a long history. But now is the time when the Polish Nuclear Energy Programme is entering a decisive stage, with nuclear technology incorporated into the country’s energy policy. The Polish Institute of International Affairs (PISM) therefore deems it proper and timely to support a debate about the benefits and risks of civil use of nuclear energy, drawing on the experiences gained in this field by other European states. The aim of the present report is to formulate conclusions and recommendations for Poland, proceeding from a comparative analysis of nuclear energy ventures in other Members States of the European Union. Crowning the research project “Nuclear Energy in Poland: Balance Sheet and Future Outlook,” carried out at the PISM, the report also covers findings of public opinion research, both quantitative and qualitative, taken by the PISM (between April and June 2014) to establish the Polish public’s attitudes towards nuclear energy.Today, with the Polish Nuclear Energy Programme formally adopted by the government (January 2014), it is high time to shift the focus from “whether” to “how” nuclear power can be put to the best use possible.
Discussions of the rationale for building a nuclear power plant in Poland have a long history. But now is the time when the Polish Nuclear Energy Programme is entering a decisive stage, with nuclear technology incorporated into the country’s energy policy. The Polish Institute of International Affairs (PISM) therefore deems it proper and timely to support a debate about the benefits and risks of civil use of nuclear energy, drawing on the experiences gained in this field by other European states. The aim of the present report is to formulate conclusions and recommendations for Poland, proceeding from a comparative analysis of nuclear energy ventures in other Members States of the European Union. Crowning the research project “Nuclear Energy in Poland: Balance Sheet and Future Outlook,” carried out at the PISM, the report also covers findings of public opinion research, both quantitative and qualitative, taken by the PISM (between April and June 2014) to establish the Polish public’s attitudes towards nuclear energy.
Today, with the Polish Nuclear Energy Programme formally adopted by the government (January 2014), it is high time to shift the focus from “whether” to “how” nuclear power can be put to the best use possible.